Sublime w/Rome – The Skints – State Theatre, Portland, Maine, November 12, 2016

When grunge music stepped on the throat of heavy metal by way of Nirvana and like-minded bands, this metal fan went searching for something else. I never got off on the grunge scene and the metal that was being produced in the 90’s wasn’t really my brand of metal, so I pretty much stuck to my old records, slowly replacing them with CD versions of the same names. I hated those years in music. However, there were a few bands that sparked my interest, enough so that I bought their releases – bands like D-Generation, Rancid, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Fishbone, Galactic Cowboys and, of course, Sublime.

I had never actually seen Sublime live before, but when I picked up a music rag recently and saw the ad for their upcoming show at the State Theatre I thought now is my chance.

Sure, the band is now basically one original cat. The original singer/guitar player died of a heroin overdose just as they were breaking onto the scene. The band were told they could not use the name Sublime since the surviving members did not own the rights. With new addition, Rome, taking over vocals and guitar, they changed their name to Sublime with Rome. A second member would leave the band many years later leaving only one original member.

That said, the music and vibe of Sublime is being kept alive and ably met by the act currently touring. The show was a near sellout, and the audience was loving what they heard, dancing, grooving and vibing to the music of Sublime.

Opening the show were The Skints, a ska band from London that I found to be quite good. Vocals were amazing and the talent from the female keyboardist shined most of all as she switched from keys to electronic drums to saxophone and flute, not to mention her angelic voice. On the way out I had to purchase a t-shirt and CD to remind me of their greatness.

About the author

James Pappaconstantine

James has been shooting concerts since 1977, He started out with his Kodak Instamatic, before moving up to a real camera (a Pentex K1000) in 1981, he has since moved through the ranks of Minolta, Sony and Cannon before landing on his Nikon D800. When not shooting a show Jim can be found singing with his own band Reverse Cowgirl or spending time with his two wonderful kids.